Urban Hydration Coconut Oil Hair Care Bundle

Our randomly selected winner is I love form beauty! They are a bit pricey but it's completely worth it. Their leave in conditioner is the best I have ever had.    
Congrats Niki! Please email [email protected] with your full name and address using Urban Hydration Coconut Oil Hair Care Bundle Winner in the subject line. Enjoy the products, and Ladies, stay tuned for our next giveaway!
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By Mary Wolff

Curls are beautiful in all their variations. While they are beautiful, they may require a good amount of care to stay healthy and looking their best. One of the biggest problems in curly hair, especially for those with thicker hair, is shrinkage. Shrinkage can make your strands look smaller, shorter, and flat. When it comes to preventing shrinkage in natural hair, here are a few tips to help you keep hair looking its best.

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1. Blow Dry Roots 
Heat is a tricky thing for curlies. It can damage hair when used too often and without properly moisturizing strands. When dealing with shrinkage, it can be your best weapon of defense.  Blow drying at the roots is a good way of preventing shrinkage in natural hair because heat causes hair to expand. The key here is to let your hair mostly dry on its own before using the blow dryer. You will get the best anti-shrinkage results if you blow dry roots that are only slightly damp as opposed to soaking wet.

2. Blow Out
With the same principle as blow-drying roots, a complete blowout might help prevent some shrinkage. This will help show off your length, but you should use this method in moderation to avoid long term hair damage. Also, make sure you use a heat protectant to be on the safe side. One of my favorites for this is Every Strand Coconut Oil & Pure Shea Protective Leave-In Hair Treatment because it is a two-in-one moisturizing treatment and heat protectant.

3. Banding 
If you want to forgo heat altogether, another option is banding. This is a method that uses hair ties to gently stretch out either wet or damp hair. You simply section hair and place the hair ties from root to tip to stretch out hair.  Let hair air dry and wrap in a satin scarf to help with fizz. It is important to note this method can lead to breakage so only use it occasionally.

4. Pull it into a High Bun 
This method of preventing shrinkage also uses the same principle of stretching hair. When you pull your hair into a high bun, you are essentially stretching the hair to avoid shrinkage. You want to pull the bun tight enough to give a good stretch but not so tight that it hurts or breaks your strands.  After a few hours in the bun, take hair down and be shrink-free!

When dealing with shrinkage there are few ways to handle the matter. With these tried and true methods, never worry about shrinkage again!

Shea Scott Edwards
If you've been rolling with CurlyNikki for a while then you're familiar with Naturally Glam, where you, the reader, got to share your natural hair journey with the rest of us. Well, we're bringing it back, this time with a focus on hair and the other aspects of your life worth highlighting. Are you in school, do you have a business, blog, products, advice, or even photos of your family to share? If you'd like to be featured in the Naturally Glam reboot- whether you live here or abroad- submit your photos and answer the questions inside this post!

First up, we have Shea Scott Edwards, originally from Richmond, VA, currently living in the City of Lost Angels. Yes, Shea's hair is gorgeous, but we also love her commitment to giving back through her online ministry, blog, lifestyle brand and YouTube talk show, "Faith Rocks." Find out why Faith may be just what you need in your life!

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Shea Scott Edwards

How long have you been natural?
I've been natural since 2006, after I got my first relaxer in LA, and my hair totally rejected the new chemicals. I did a gradual chop over the course of a few months because I couldn't fathom doing a BIG chop all at once.

What have you learned about yourself since going natural?
I've learned that my hair is such a huge part of my self-expression. Being natural makes me feel so connected to my spirit and culture. During the past four years, I experimented with a platinum blonde pixie (on and off) and although I LOVED the look and color it totally stripped the natural curl pattern from my hair. It was similar to having a relaxer. I've learned the health of my hair and natural defined curls are more important to me than color or bone straight looks. I want to be an example to my daughter in celebrating her naturally curly hair. I've learned I'm a naturalista for LIFE!

Tell us about 'Faith Rocks."
As an online ministry, blog, lifestyle brand and YouTube talk show, Faith Rocks is the #1 Destination for Faith & Lifestyle. We exist to encourage innovators, artists and entrepreneurs to have a personal, intimate relationship with Jesus Christ. We believe in incorporating faith into every aspect of life. We are on a mission to spread the Gospel throughout the world by helping others experience the unconditional love, peace and freedom that comes through a surrendered life to Christ. I've recently written my first book, "Success in Celibacy" the Millennial's ultimate guide for self care through embarking upon the celibate journey. It's about identity, integrity, love, stillness and transformation. Life can be just as glamorous and fulfilling with NO sex in the city...at least for now. This book is EVERYTHING I wish I had in high school, college and while young-"adulting." It is currently available for pre-order on my website.


Why and when did you create "Faith Rocks?"
I've always dreamed of having a talk show. I started out as a panelist on the BET show, Teen Summit back in the day. After finishing graduate school at UCLA, I answered the call to ministry. Not too long after, (About 5-6 years ago) my husband and I came up with the "Faith Rocks" Talk Show as a way for me to encourage people on the daily grind of life by offering quick message, guest interviews and prayers on YouTube. I'd experienced so much rejection and defeat as an aspiring actress and needed to turn those lemons into lemonade. Faith Rocks is a form of total artistic expression enabling me to use my trials and triumphs as a way to help other people find God or become stronger in their faith. I chose to use the rejection, fear and sacrifice, mixed in with an unshakeable fire in my bones for the Lord in an effort to spread an authentic, relatable message of faith!

How can it help us?
We live in an era where people are looking for deeper intimacy with God, but don't necessarily connect to the culture of attending church for one reason or another. Faith Rocks is an online ministry for people in the in-between seasons of finding a church home OR to just be there to help enhance your current relationship with God.


Did going natural help in creating "Faith Rocks" in any way?
My esteem has grown through being natural. I've always been on a journey of finding, "my best look" similar to my walk with God, I was always looking for "the best spiritual path" for me. In trying so many different looks and exploring many different ways of doing things my own way I realized my best look is just being free. Natural hair gives me the ultimate freedom as does my walk with God. Natural hair helps me stay in my own lane and celebrate all that is uniquely me. It helps me combat comparison by accepting the skin I'm in and celebrating other women doing the same. Now, I will press my hair sometimes, wear braids and may even put in some clip ins- but being naturally glam is my most effortless, authentic look. I think women relate to me more in business and ministry with natural hair because they look and think, "there goes a woman unafraid of being her most authentic-self."

Can you share any favorite black-owned products that you use? 
Kinky Curly Curling Custard/Gel
Cantu Shea Butter Conditioner Creme

To keep up with Shea visit:
Website: https://sheascottedwards.com/
IG: https://www.instagram.com/faith_rocks83/
YouTube: http://youtube.com/slsworldwide

To submit to be featured in Naturally Glam email: [email protected]
And answer these questions
1) Where are you from and how long have you been natural?
2) Do you have any fav black-owned products that you use?
3) What do you do and why do you love it?
5) If you have a business, are in school, have a blog, products you sell, advice to give, or family that you are proud of and want to share, please do.
6) Has having natural hair contributed to you meeting your life goals? If so, how?
7) What's been the best part of your natural hair journey or your hair journey in general?

By Kanisha Parks

Lurking in the comment sections / dropping shade left and right
Mad at the world / always ready to fight.
They think they run the hair scene / their way or none
Natural Hair Nazis / mad since day one.


Seriously, cheesy poetry aside: Natural Hair Nazism is real and thriving. It’s unfortunate, really, because ultimately, it really is just hair. But Natural Hair Nazis take this hair thing to a wholeee other level. While being natural for seven years, I heard the term “Natural Hair Nazi” thrown around pretty consistently but since returning relaxed, the term instantly became personal. I never knew how much women cared about other women’s hair!

What’s more is, Natural Hair Nazis don’t just discriminate against relaxed ladies—they get mad at the hair choices of other naturals too! They feel as though “being natural” should be conducted a certain way, and anything contrary to their opinion of what it means to be natural is frowned upon.
So the question is (and be real)—are you a Natural Hair Nazi? Let’s find out!

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You don’t like it when naturals define their curls.
You feel like naturals should just let their hair “be,” and that if women prefer their hair defined it means they’re not happy with the way their hair naturally acts. You ride or die for the wash and go, and you mean that literally—not wash, define, and go. You get bothered when you see a natural who invests a lot of time in making sure her hair looks “perfect,” and think she’s doing too much.


You don’t like when naturals straighten their hair.
You think they’re “trying to be European.” (Insert exhausted eye roll). That they think beauty means sleek, straight hair. That they’re trying to “tame” their curls, coils, and kinks instead of embracing them. That they prefer the straight look because society’s beauty standards are still influencing their hair decisions.


You don’t like temporary straightening kits or hair dyes.
Of course if a Natural Hair Nazi is against straightening hair, temporary kits (like the Beautiful Textures Naturally Straight Texture Manageability System) are definitely a big no-no. You can’t stand words like, “tame,” or “manage,” so when you see other naturals gravitating towards those options, your claws come out. You think that anything that somehow alters the hair texture, even temporarily, is off limits. Even hair dyes are a no for you—henna is okay but anything remotely chemical and/or permanent means the person isn’t natural anymore.

You don’t like fake hair of any kind.
Weaves, wigs, extensions. You’re not for women who choose to protective style with weave. Especially straight ones. The only weaves you semi-tolerate are ones that are closest to the person’s natural hair texture. Even then, she better not have it in too long or else that means she’s trying to avoid dealing with her own hair which again, means she’s not comfortable with her natural hair.

You have no tolerance for women who relax their hair.
Last but most definitely not least, you feel like relaxers are ultimate sin. You don’t even want to interact with women who have relaxers and think they’re not “woke,” or aren’t tapped into their African heritage. You think they secretly want to be white and are going to damage their hair beyond belief. You’re ready to stage an intervention.

Sure, I may have exaggerated some of these, but real talk: please stop trying to dictate what another woman should or shouldn’t do with her hair and simply worry about what grows on your own head. That’s all.

Love, your friendly neighborhood former natural.

Serious question, are you a Natural Hair Nazi?
Kanisha is a Christian writer/author based in Augusta, GA. Other than CurlyNikki.com, she has also written for BlackNaps.organd Devozine, and has authored a book of poetry entitled, "Love Letters from the Master." Kanisha can be contacted for business inquiries at [email protected]

By Veronica Wells

When I was first hired on at MadameNoire, I quickly learned that if we needed a traffic boost, all I had to do was write something about hair. It got to the point where I started feeling like I wrote, almost exclusively about hair. And eventually, I got burnt out. As a result, I vowed that I would no longer spend my days writing about something so “trivial.” I pulled a Solange. I said I wasn’t talking about no damn hair no mo only to continue talking about hair; Solange in the single from A Seat At The Table and me by writing for this Black women’s publication that focuses on our hair.

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It’s unavoidable. Not to mention the conversations surrounding our hair are rather fascinating. Like this picture of Shannon Brown and his wife, singer Monica, taken at rapper Gucci and Keyshia Kaoir’s wedding.

Singer Monica and husband Shannon Brown
If you see a beautiful, Black couple in love, you are nothing like the people in The Shade Room who used this series of photos as an opportunity to discuss Shannon’s cornrows. People, mostly women, clowned them, talking about everything from the style being outdated and juvenile to the length of the braids and how he had them tucked under one another.

I didn’t like Shannon’s hair either. But since cornrows were the go-to style of my adolescence, I wasn’t so quick to dismiss it as played out. And I thought the conversation, while hilarious, was a bit mean-spirited. After all, nothing says Black hair across the diaspora like cornrows. It’s unique. It’s ours and I don’t know if we should be so quick to write it off.

Last week, the internet was in an uproar about a J. Crew/Madewell ad featuring Dominican model Mari Henny Pasible. Everyone swore that J.Crew had dropped the ball in their incapability to hire a stylist who knew what to do with Black hair. I mean people were outraged, making jokes about wanting to fight the clothing company for allowing this Black woman to look “bad,” in a nationally disseminated ad campaign.
Model Mari Henny Pasible J. Crew
The whole J. Crew discussion reminded me of another one I had with real friends--or friends of friends rather. In a moment of candid conversation, they asked me my advice on what to do with a friend who was wearing her natural hair in a way they deemed “unkempt.” With genuine concern, they said, “I mean, I’m all for her embracing her natural texture but it needs to be styled differently. Why can’t she do something else with it?”

My response to them was something like the one the J. Crew model eventually offered. Both were looks the friend and the model had readily embraced and were happy to showcase. There is no “right” way to be natural.

We saw a similar discussion play out with Beyoncé and the way she let Blue Ivy wear her hair. We saw it in the comments issued by Isaiah Washington and Tyrese when they encouraged Black women to stop wearing weaves and fake hair, and with the everyday Black men who encouraged one Black woman to put her wig back on.

 
Nosugarnocreammagazine instagram
When I first started thinking about the very story you’re reading right now, it was two separate topics. Why Black women believed cornrows were over and why men like Tyrese and Isaiah felt they had the right to tell us how to wear our hair. But it’s bigger than that.

As a community, we take an almost unhealthy interest and concern in the ways in which other Black people wear their own hair. Rarely, as a community do we stop with “I don’t like her hair” or “I don’t like his hair.” There is an entire dissertation why the way someone has chosen to wear their hair is “not right.” When I was considering the reasons for this phenomenon, I didn’t have to think too hard. For Black folk, there is the burden in the belief that the way we wear our hair says something about not only our personalities but our philosophies. There are thoughts that wearing “fake” hair means you don’t love yourself or embrace your Black features. There are people who will argue that it’s deceptive.

But more than anything, the reason Black folk are so concerned about what other people are doing with their Black hair is largely based on respectability politics. Beyond just a style or a preference, for centuries many Black folk believed that if we didn’t wear our hair in ways that were similar to or appealed to White people we were only going to be allowed to get so far in life. It was the reason my mother told me after I’d gone natural, to buy a wig for job interviews. It’s the reason that Wendy Williams said Viola Davis’ natural hair wasn’t appropriate for the red carpet. It’s the reason HBCUs forbid certain hairstyles in their business schools. And the reason Steve Perry and Steve Harvey applauded a group of young, Black men who made the decision to cut off their locs, braids and fros in favor of a look that was connected to the “aesthetics of success.” Whose aesthetic? Furthermore, what type of success is there to be had when you have to mask your cultural or racial identity to attain it?

There are times when we’re judging, commenting, clowning, and policing one another’s hair for the sake of coolness and style. As a people who invented style and embody cool, that will always be the case. But more concerning are the times when the ownership we take over one another’s hair is clearly our own grappling with fully accepting Black hair. For so many of us there is still hesitancy in accepting Black looks that don’t adhere to certain Eurocentric beauty standards (i.e. perfectly slicked edges, length minimums, texture preferences). The real tragedy in what we’ve been convinced to think of ourselves and our features, whether through images, representation, or oppression, is that even when White folks aren’t even thinking about dismissing or denigrating our hair, we do it to ourselves.

Why do you believe we 'police' each other's hair so much?

Veronica Wells is the culture editor at MadameNoire.com. She is also the author of “Bettah Days” and the creator of the website NoSugarNoCreamMag. You can follow her on Facebook and on Instagram and Twitter @VDubShrug.