Shena and Mom
Born in Flint, and raised outside of Tallahassee, Fl, Shena is a social worker, mom, and sister girl who loves hanging out with her friends. She also loves her mom. Find out what makes her naturally glam!



How long have you been natural?
I've been natural for ten years.

What are your fav products?
Shea moisture curl smoothie, carols daughter hair milk, as I am co-wash, eco gel-olive oil or coconut oil.

What's your favorite look?
I like to change my hair color because I think it gives me a different look even if I have the same style. Unfortunately, my natural hair color is a dull and dusty color that always seems to be darker than I would like.

Shena with her kids
What do you do for fun?
I’m a mother of two so they keep me busy, but I love hanging with friends. Out for drinks, traveling, and now being an active planner (a life of organization is in the near future).


How do you stay healthy?

I joined a gym in Sept., so I’m exercising 3x a week and planning lunches (at least m-thurs. weekly). I cook a lot too so I think that helps my family eat healthy. Also, I'm trying to drink more water daily. I can feel it in my skin, body, and hair when I don’t.

How has having natural hair contributed to your life?

I’m pretty confident at this point because it has been a while and it now seems the healthiest thing for my hair. Perming was definitely damaging my hair and stripping it to the max (I wore color often too). Plus a lot more women now are natural so it is encouraging to see that as well.


Did you have any positive hair role models growing up?
I'm not certain about positive hair role models. My mom's hair is super fine and curly too (she’s biracial), so I couldn’t look at her hair and see my own. A number of my friends and their moms wore their hair permed so I did as well.


Did you have 'hair envy' with your mom?

As a young kid I never really thought about different textures than my mom. I had really long hair and my mom always kept my hair in very neat braids and ponys. I never had hair envy with my mom. She is and always was beautiful to me and I feel I look just like her in a browner skin. I love my hair because it has always been soft, manageable, and a part of me.


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If you'd like to be featured in Naturally Glam submit your photos to [email protected] and answer these questions!

1) Where are you from/live and how long have you been natural?
2) What products do you use on your hair?
3) If you have a business, are in school, have a blog, products you sell, a job in a field you'd like to talk about, have initiatives and organizations you'd like to highlight, advice to give, or family that you are proud of and want to share, please do.
4) How has having natural hair contributed to your life? Your self-esteem?
5) What's been the best part of your natural hair journey or your hair journey in general?
6) What do you do for fun?
7) How do you stay healthy 

Model Naomi Campbell
By Erickka Sy Savane

There was a moment a few months ago when I was getting ready for an event, standing in the mirror with a tube of lipstick, wondering why I was about to paint my face. I’d done it a zillion times without question, but this time, I just felt silly. What I really wanted was to go completely as I am. Now, I don’t mean butt-naked, but naked-face. Is this what it means to get older? Still, I went ahead and did it, and when I got to the event and posed the question to a few friends they looked at me like I was smoking crack. Wanna clear a room? Start talking about age. My bad.

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However, as Alicia Keys has continued to pop up all over the place sans makeup I feel vindicated. I mean, Alicia is a mom, like myself, and she’s getting older, plus she's got a lot to 'lose' by showing up as a star without the perceived 'shine' (makeup to give her that 'glow'). So really, I feel the need to ask, how do we feel about makeup?  Does saying no come with age?

Alicia Keys
I start with one of my favorite California girls, Angie B. T.
A model back in the day, Angie never left home without a fully made up face. In fact, sometimes she wore makeup to bed. How does she feel about it today, now that she's in her forties?

“I still love makeup, and lashes, and adorning myself with jewelry,” she says, “but what has changed is I don’t feel the need to wear it all the time. I appreciate my beauty without it.”

She says the change wasn’t so much an age thing, but more about the different changes in her life. She broke up with her finance, her mom and sister both passed away in the same year, and not long after she fell, fracturing both of her ankles.

“It was hard at first, not to feel sorry for myself,” she says looking back, “but being in that space where I was literally crawling to the bathroom with no makeup on for such a long period of time stripped away all the pretense I had in my life. I had to find my inner strength and what re-emerged was this beautiful woman that I am today.”

Wow, what don’t break you makes you stronger. She does still have two makeup must-haves…

“I have to wear a little concealer under my eyes and I must fill-in my eyebrows because I never had any growing up, and without them I look like an embryo,” she jokes.

Okay, so now I’m thinking about my partner in crime, super-producer Sidra Smith. Not because she looks like an embryo, but she is all about that face- no makeup, no hair, she don’t even care. Talk about a natural beauty. Has she always been this way or has it come with age?

“I’ve always been this way. Even back when I was modeling I was never that girl to run around after a shoot in full makeup. The only time I do feel a certain pressure to wear it is on the red carpet and making appearances with my twin,” she says. Ironically, her identical twin sister is ultra-glam actress Tasha Smith, and the two couldn’t look more different, and yet the same.

Sidra and Tasha Smith
So would she ever do red carpet appearances bare-faced?

“Absolutely!” she says with conviction. “I get more compliments and feel more beautiful without it. If anything, makeup makes me feel cheesy.”

She nailed it because, looking back, cheesy is how I felt at the event that night. Why did I ultimately do it? Vanity, and wanting to fit in. But when I really think about it though, it’s not so much about age or whether to wear makeup or not, but the freedom to live the way we want to live. Today, I put on bright green socks when I went for my morning jog, something that I’ve been wanting to do for weeks, but would tell myself that it didn’t match, and what would people think? It’s nice to know that I no longer care.

How do you feel about makeup? Is wearing it a must or does it depend?

Erickka Sy Savané is managing editor of CurlyNikki.com, a wife, mom, and freelance writer based in Jersey, City, NJ. Her work has appeared in Essence.comEbony.com, Madamenoire.com, xoNecole.com, and more. When she’s not writing...wait, she’s always writing! Follow her on Twitter, Instagram or ErickkaSySavane.com
Via naturalhairslays on instagram
By Mary Wolff

Curls are beautiful in all their variations. While they are beautiful, they may require a good amount of care to stay healthy and looking their best. One of the biggest problems in curly hair, especially for those with thicker hair, is shrinkage. Shrinkage can make your strands look smaller, shorter, and flat. When it comes to preventing shrinkage in natural hair, here are a few tips to help you keep hair looking its best.

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1. Blow Dry Roots 
Heat is a tricky thing for curlies. It can damage hair when used too often and without properly moisturizing strands. When dealing with shrinkage, it can be your best weapon of defense.  Blow drying at the roots is a good way of preventing shrinkage in natural hair because heat causes hair to expand. The key here is to let your hair mostly dry on its own before using the blow dryer. You will get the best anti-shrinkage results if you blow dry roots that are only slightly damp as opposed to soaking wet.

2. Blow Out
With the same principle as blow-drying roots, a complete blowout might help prevent some shrinkage. This will help show off your length, but you should use this method in moderation to avoid long term hair damage. Also, make sure you use a heat protectant to be on the safe side. One of my favorites for this is Every Strand Coconut Oil & Pure Shea Protective Leave-In Hair Treatment because it is a two-in-one moisturizing treatment and heat protectant.

3. Banding 
If you want to forgo heat altogether, another option is banding. This is a method that uses hair ties to gently stretch out either wet or damp hair. You simply section hair and place the hair ties from root to tip to stretch out hair.  Let hair air dry and wrap in a satin scarf to help with fizz. It is important to note this method can lead to breakage so only use it occasionally.

4. Pull it into a High Bun 
This method of preventing shrinkage also uses the same principle of stretching hair. When you pull your hair into a high bun, you are essentially stretching the hair to avoid shrinkage. You want to pull the bun tight enough to give a good stretch but not so tight that it hurts or breaks your strands.  After a few hours in the bun, take hair down and be shrink-free!

When dealing with shrinkage there are few ways to handle the matter. With these tried and true methods, never worry about shrinkage again!


By Kanisha Parks

Lurking in the comment sections / dropping shade left and right
Mad at the world / always ready to fight.
They think they run the hair scene / their way or none
Natural Hair Nazis / mad since day one.


Seriously, cheesy poetry aside: Natural Hair Nazism is real and thriving. It’s unfortunate, really, because ultimately, it really is just hair. But Natural Hair Nazis take this hair thing to a wholeee other level. While being natural for seven years, I heard the term “Natural Hair Nazi” thrown around pretty consistently but since returning relaxed, the term instantly became personal. I never knew how much women cared about other women’s hair!

What’s more is, Natural Hair Nazis don’t just discriminate against relaxed ladies—they get mad at the hair choices of other naturals too! They feel as though “being natural” should be conducted a certain way, and anything contrary to their opinion of what it means to be natural is frowned upon.
So the question is (and be real)—are you a Natural Hair Nazi? Let’s find out!

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You don’t like it when naturals define their curls.
You feel like naturals should just let their hair “be,” and that if women prefer their hair defined it means they’re not happy with the way their hair naturally acts. You ride or die for the wash and go, and you mean that literally—not wash, define, and go. You get bothered when you see a natural who invests a lot of time in making sure her hair looks “perfect,” and think she’s doing too much.


You don’t like when naturals straighten their hair.
You think they’re “trying to be European.” (Insert exhausted eye roll). That they think beauty means sleek, straight hair. That they’re trying to “tame” their curls, coils, and kinks instead of embracing them. That they prefer the straight look because society’s beauty standards are still influencing their hair decisions.


You don’t like temporary straightening kits or hair dyes.
Of course if a Natural Hair Nazi is against straightening hair, temporary kits (like the Beautiful Textures Naturally Straight Texture Manageability System) are definitely a big no-no. You can’t stand words like, “tame,” or “manage,” so when you see other naturals gravitating towards those options, your claws come out. You think that anything that somehow alters the hair texture, even temporarily, is off limits. Even hair dyes are a no for you—henna is okay but anything remotely chemical and/or permanent means the person isn’t natural anymore.

You don’t like fake hair of any kind.
Weaves, wigs, extensions. You’re not for women who choose to protective style with weave. Especially straight ones. The only weaves you semi-tolerate are ones that are closest to the person’s natural hair texture. Even then, she better not have it in too long or else that means she’s trying to avoid dealing with her own hair which again, means she’s not comfortable with her natural hair.

You have no tolerance for women who relax their hair.
Last but most definitely not least, you feel like relaxers are ultimate sin. You don’t even want to interact with women who have relaxers and think they’re not “woke,” or aren’t tapped into their African heritage. You think they secretly want to be white and are going to damage their hair beyond belief. You’re ready to stage an intervention.

Sure, I may have exaggerated some of these, but real talk: please stop trying to dictate what another woman should or shouldn’t do with her hair and simply worry about what grows on your own head. That’s all.

Love, your friendly neighborhood former natural.

Serious question, are you a Natural Hair Nazi?
Kanisha is a Christian writer/author based in Augusta, GA. Other than CurlyNikki.com, she has also written for BlackNaps.organd Devozine, and has authored a book of poetry entitled, "Love Letters from the Master." Kanisha can be contacted for business inquiries at [email protected]
Liv of LiveNaturallyLove
Hi Loves,
This natural hair 4b/4c protective style is perfect for holiday season, winter, graduation, prom, anything! Click to see how I achieved this sleek ponytail look. I hope you enjoy!!!✨
Love,
Liv

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