by Tiffani Greenaway of MyMommyVents.com

Scarves. Head wraps. Geles. Black women have long celebrated their culture and pride with intriciate wraps of fabric. Twisted this way and that, a woman's head wrap speaks volumes about her confidence, her lineage, and her ancestry.

But is wearing a head wrap in a corporate setting appropriate?

Continue!>>>


It's a question I've asked myself when a twistout didn't turn out quite the way I'd hoped, or I simply wanted to accessorize. Can a head wrap become a political statement, or a reason for HR to call me into their office?

One woman explores her feelings and the history behind head wraps in an XO Jane piece, "How A Head Wrap Taught Me An Important Lesson About Professionalism And Race." Alisha Acquaye struggled with the decision to wear a head wrap at her new job. "Practical reasons aside, I stopped myself before bringing a colorful cloth to my head, wrapping both sides into an intricate contraption and stepping into my office," she writes. "Is it acceptable for us to wear that too, America, without people judging us or disliking it or deeming us “non-professional”?

Although head wraps are seen as an article of cultural pride, we still have to contend with the stares, uninvited comments, and criticsms of coworkers, higher ups, and people who just don't know any better. "That is one of the first things I noticed when I started wearing headwraps in general. People thought about how to treat me. They wondered if me wearing a headwrap meant I was straight from Africa."


Head wraps have a long and complicated history. "For the African woman, the headwrap represents far more than a piece of fabric wound around the head : it holds a distinctive position in the history for its longevity and potent significations as it has endured the travail of slavery...The enslaved and their descendants, however, have regarded the headwrap as a helmet of courage, a uniform of communal identity standing for absolute resistance to loss of self-definition." Back in 18th century Louisiana, we were actually required to cover our hair under the Tignon Law. "Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."

Head wraps or not, we're just plain fly--and that's something we can't cover up.

Have you ever worn a head wrap to work?

*********************

Tiffani Greenway is the wife and mom behind MyMommyVents, a New York city parenting blog. Her tips have been seen on Yahoo Parenting, Mommy Noire, and Fit Pregnancy. Find more of Tiffani's work at mymommyvents.com.
#Boogie

Hola Chicas!

It's Monday and I'm on the roof!  If you've got hurr, life (or whatever and what have you) questions, ask below!

I'll do my best to get to them all!

Later Gators,
Nik


PAST PICS!

2-22-2016
the result of a chunky twist-out on dry hair (old roller set) using Jane Carter's Twist-Out Foam-- I was super impressed... great definition, shiny and not flaky or crunchy! I didn't add any water or any other product-- just one or two pumps per twist (I created 15 twists and rolled the ends on skinny flexi rods).  xoxo

2-29-2016
Curlformer set on the Boogie using a little coconut oil + JC's Twist-Out Foam and Set it Free on the ends.  #OnTheGrow 

3-7-2016
#RioAgain #Lapa

#RioAgainTho

3-21-2016

 that paragraph before 'bliss, joy and happiness', tho
*Silence of the Heart - Robert Adams* 


7-3-2016
My sister, Syl, is a married woman! #Summer16 #MorePicsToCome

7/25/2016 (4 mos pregnant!)


1st day of 1st grade! My little Boogie is 6 years old today!

8/29/2016


Thanks Houston for all the love! (hugs and kisses to Karisma Burton and Momma!)
9/12/2016


Erika writes:
A few years ago, my hair dresser shared that people with my color hair (a dark but very sandy and shine free brown, that's very blond in the sun), have a very "unique" natural hair texture. I've observed a few other SB's like myself (sandy browns) and I see the following commonalities:

Read More!!>>>
Characteristics of My Sandy Brown Hair:
  • Fine ( and I will repeat this again)
  • Very dry and porous (can never get enough moisture and sucks it up from anywhere)
  • Very fragile, breaks easily, and very susceptible to mechanical damage
  • Easily heat damaged ( I still have a press and curl from 12 months ago in my head)
  • Deceptively fine & easily straightened, yet very high shrinkage ( 80% +) and fairly 'kinky'
  • Sucks up color & keeps it (there is no such thing as semi-permanent or rinse color for me, it's there forever)
  • Easily weighed down by products that usually work for 4a/4b hair, however my hair looks like 4a/4b hair but acts like some hybrid of 3-4/b
I also noticed whenever I get a sew in weave, it seems to tangle horribly (especially the wet and wavy, curly blond mat quickly). All the while I find myself insanely jealous of darker haired curlies who seem to fair better than me.

Is it My Hair Color? Or My Texture? 

Is there something in particular curlies of this type can do? I have finally started to find some products/regimens that work to a degree, but only through A LOT of trial and error. If there is a connection I'd love to know more about it so I can tailor my hair care accordingly. Is there something to natural hair color in relation to ones hair texture? 


Weigh in!

The following post was written in February 2011 and has been republished for grammar and clarity.

Erika writes:
A few years ago, my hair dresser shared that people with my color hair (a dark but very sandy and shine free brown, that's very blond in the sun), have a very "unique" natural hair texture. I've observed a few other SB's like myself (sandy browns) and I see the following commonalities:

Read More!!>>>
Characteristics of My Sandy Brown Hair:
  • Fine ( and I will repeat this again)
  • Very dry and porous (can never get enough moisture and sucks it up from anywhere)
  • Very fragile, breaks easily, and very susceptible to mechanical damage
  • Easily heat damaged ( I still have a press and curl from 12 months ago in my head)
  • Deceptively fine & easily straightened, yet very high shrinkage ( 80% +) and fairly 'kinky'
  • Sucks up color & keeps it (there is no such thing as semi-permanent or rinse color for me, it's there forever)
  • Easily weighed down by products that usually work for 4a/4b hair, however my hair looks like 4a/4b hair but acts like some hybrid of 3-4/b
I also noticed whenever I get a sew in weave, it seems to tangle horribly (especially the wet and wavy, curly blond mat quickly). All the while I find myself insanely jealous of darker haired curlies who seem to fair better than me.

Is it My Hair Color? Or My Texture? 

Is there something in particular curlies of this type can do? I have finally started to find some products/regimens that work to a degree, but only through A LOT of trial and error. If there is a connection I'd love to know more about it so I can tailor my hair care accordingly. Is there something to natural hair color in relation to ones hair texture? 


Weigh in!

The following post was written in February 2011 and has been republished for grammar and clarity.

Hola Chicas,

Bantu Knots create the most gorgeous spiral effect when you release them... it gives you results unlike any twist or braid out. It's the perfect style because everyone can try it-- transitioners looking to blend textures, divas with straight hair and naturals of most lengths.

But the question is always the same...do you get the perfect bantu knot out on wet or dry hair?

Read More!!>>>

Bantu Knots on Dry Hair:


Here's a video from Alyssa Forever on how she styles her bantu knot outs with dry hair. She washes her hair first and then detangles it. She then gets her hair dry by blow drying it (after putting on a heat protectant, of course). This is up to you, you can always choose to air dry your hair rather than blow dry. But she swears by dry bantu knots, and putting as little product as possible. For Alyssa, the key to perfect dry bantu knots is ensuring that each twist is perfect. No tangles, knots or snags. Brush each strand of hair before you twist to make sure it's as smooth as possible.

Bantu Knots on Wet Hair: 

This video is from CurlyKTwintyone. She likes to do her bantu knot outs on wet hair. She styles her hair with freshly co-washed, deep conditioned hair so it's nice and slippery. If her hair dries out during the process, she sprays it with a mixture of water and aloe vera gel. When she takes down, she separates with her fingers, and twirls the less defined more frizzy spots. The result? Super moisturized, defined fluffy coils.

Put to the Test 

4CHairChick and Evelyn from the Internets took this matter into their own hands and decided to test both. Evelyn preferred doing bantu knots on dry hair, which resulted in more defined, frizz free coils. 4cHairChick agreed that wet bantu knots look too separated, and not fluffy enough to her liking. She preferred dry bantu knots as well. Overall, wet bantu knots were too unpredictable and took too long to dry. Watch the episode here:



What CN Says About Bantu Knots: 

Do you create them on wet, damp or dry hair?
-Wet in the past, but damp would work MUCH better! They'd actually have a chance to dry.

Fav products?
-Conditioner and an oil or butter to seal the ends. Remember to go light with products as this style has a tendency to take forever and a day to dry.


Twirl and knot one strand, or do you create two strand twists?
-I create two strand twists, and then knot.


Bobby pins or tuck the ends?
-I tuck the ends, you'd be amazed at how well they hold!

Air dry or bonnet dryer?
-I air dry, but bonnet drying creates a smoother and longer lasting set in my opinion. Occasionally, if pressed for time, I'll bonnet dry for 30 minutes and allow it to air dry the rest of the way. 


Take down method?
-I carefully unravel them one at a time. Take down the twist and massage the roots to cover up any patchiness. I then separate and gently finger comb through the roots to fluff.

Maintenance routine?
-I sleep with my hair out on a satin pillow case.


Are you a knot-out queen?! If so, how do you achieve the perfect Bantu Knot-Out?!