By Mary Wolff

When it comes to your hair, you want it to be as healthy as possible. Most people understand the connection between the foods we eat and the way we feel. Did you know the foods you eat are just as important in the way you look, too? This should come as no surprise to anyone that a well-balanced diet is key to looking and feeling your best. However, there have been some new studies which look at the role of Vitamin D in particular as related to healthy hair. While it takes several different elements of nutrition to get great locks, there are many reasons to add more Vitamin D for healthy hair.

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Recent studies are showing a direct link between vitamin D and hair growth. Whether you suffer from a hair loss condition and are looking to regenerate some strands, or you simply want to add some inches, this nutrient may be the answer. A study published in Journal of Investigative Dermatology confirmed a connection between vitamin D and the ability to create new growth at the follicle level. Studies have also been performed to look at not just the inability to grow hair, but also whether or not Vitamin D plays a role in hair loss. A study in The Journal of Biological Chemistry found that vitamin D receptors failing can cause alopecia which is a medical condition of hair loss. Hair grows in a hair cycle staging method. The anagen is the growth phase, followed by catagens which is the regressing stage, and then finally followed by the telogen stage also called the resting stage. There are now studies which support the fact that vitamin D production plays a role in both the anagen (growth) phase, as well as the telogen (resting) stage.


While the main goal of vitamin D is to support bone health, the abilities of this powerhouse are becoming more and more evident in terms of hair health. Before you rush out to stock up on supplements, there are a few things to keep in mind regarding vitamin D for healthy hair. The body naturally produces this vitamin provided you do not have a deficiency. When the body comes in contact with direct sunlight, vitamin D is naturally produced within the body and then transferred to meet the needs of your bones, teeth, hair, and other functions. It can also be found in certain foods such as eggs, tuna, salmon, milk, and cheese. If you are concerned about your vitamin D levels, you should consult your doctor before taking a supplement since they can provide you with safe lifestyle changes to make in order to get the right levels of vitamin D.
Sources
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022202X15415246
http://www.jbc.org/content/278/40/38665.short

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